Posts tagged ‘poetry’

April 1, 2014

Celebrating National Poetry Month: Using Poetry to Connect Children and Nature

by Melissa Harding

cherry blossoms 2

Genuine poetry can communicate before it is understood. – T.S. Eliot

April is National Poetry Month, a celebration of the richness that poetry gives to our lives. Though some may think that poetry is becoming irrelevant in our modern world, there are many more who can tell you the impact that writing or reading poetry has on their lives. In fact, poetry is an important touchstone to reality in the digital era in which we live. A poem is a powerful thing – some poems can target your soul and never let go; the same poem can give one person a feeling of peace and yet stir the passions of another. To quote Plato, “Poetry is nearer to vital truth than history.” It truly does deserve its own month of celebration.

Last year, as part of a special series focusing on modern poetry, National Public Radio offered its listeners a chance to write and submit their own poems celebrating Washington, D.C’s famous cherry blossoms in bloom. After receiving hundred of submissions, twenty of the best were selected for reprint; the three best poems were used as the inspiration for several short films.

Here are several winning entries, in no particular order:

cherry blossom 2park bench take-away
the sky and cherry blossoms
in a cup of tea
— Paul Conneally

the petals fall from
an evening cherry blossom
she kisses him first
— Jenni L. Backs

Settled on a bench
In the lilting fragrance
of cherry blossoms
— Ric Cochran

Wet April morning–
Windshield wiper blades
heavy with cherry blossoms.
— Joel Dias-Porter

streetlamps in the haze …
this morning the stone lions
catch cherry blossoms
— Judy Totts

fhfhfhfh

Just as anyone who observes the world around them is a naturalist, so too is anyone who writes a poem a poet. Writing poetry is a wonderful way to connect to nature. While it may be difficult to go outside and draw a bird that you observe, it is very easy to write a short poem about it. If you or your child are feeling intimidated by the idea of nature journaling, try writing short poems about your time outside. Don’t worry about sounding like Walt Whitman, a poem doesn’t have to be an ode to a tree. It can anything, even humorous! Poems don’t have to rhyme and can be short or long; they can be about a bird or the gum on your shoe. Children in particular may enjoy writing poems about things that are gross, weird or funny. A poem describing the wonders of rabbit poop in the yard may seem silly, but writing it requires important time spent observing.

Poetry can help to express how nature makes you feel, what you experience with your senses and what you think about your time outside; it can clarify your experience in a unique way. In fact, writing poetry about nature can be a gateway to expressing other ideas as well; poetry can be a great way for children to express things that are difficult or scary. It can be a tool to help you understand your child’s feelings as well as a way for him or her to share openly with you. Additionally, poetry is a great introduction to reading for young children and may be useful in converting reluctant readers into avid ones. The poems of Shel Silverstein are silly and fun – perfect for a child who thinks reading is boring. Finally, poems make lovely gifts; tuck one in a library book before you return it or mail one in a card. This is a great way for your child to practice random acts of kindness towards others; it is really enjoyable to sneak poems into odd places with the hope of making someone else’s day.

In short, poetry is a great tool to keep in your nature journaling toolbox as well as in your life. Be open to the idea that a poem can be anything and anywhere; the sky is the limit when writing a poem. Remember, “You will find poetry nowhere unless you bring some of it with you.” (Joseph Joubert)

If you want to get started, try some of these easy tips for writing poems with your child:
1. Exaggeration Poem: Write a crazy poem that exaggerates the attributes of an object to great lengths.
2. List Poem: Make your poem a list of all the neat things that you see, attributes of a subject, or thing you feel.
3. Stretchy Metaphor: Find five verbs and five nouns from one subject area, like nature, and use them to write about another subject, like school.
4. Point of View Poem: Write a poem from the point of view of another object, like a plant or a bird.
5. Haiku: A haiku is a three line poem with 5 syllables on the first line, 7 on the second, and 5 on the last.
6. Weather Poem: Start each line of your poem with the same phrase, like “When it rains” or “When it’s cold outside”.

To read more cherry blossom haikus and watch the accompanying videos, check out NPR’s article.

If you are looking for other ways to celebrate National Poetry Month or incorporate more poetry into your life, check out these ideas from The Academy of American Poets. Try writing a poem on the pavement or giving a poem to someone you love!

The above photos of cherry blossoms in Washington, D.C.  are courtesy of NPR.

March 6, 2014

Connecting to Nature Through Poetry: Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

by Melissa Harding

winter

Connecting to Nature Through Poetry is a segment of the blog featuring poets who inspire their readers to establish strong connections to nature and community. An appreciation of poetry and art is connected to achievement in science and success in adult life; however, there is no need to be an expert on poetry to enjoy it. Poetry is for everyone.  As Plato once said, “Poetry is nearer to vital truth than history”.  

“The true glory of a nation consists not in the extent of its territory, the pomp of its forests, the majesty of its rivers, the height of its mountains, and the beauty of its sky; but in the extent of its mental power, the majesty of its intellect, the height and depth and purity of its moral nature.”   – Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, 1832.

Does the name of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow remind you vaguely of high school? Chances are that’s because high school was the last time you heard about him. As celebrated as he was in his time, the early 19th century, he has become obscure in this time. It’s tempting to judge poets from times past as being too stuffy or boring for a modern audience. Which is too bad, really, because Longfellow’s poems have a true romantic’s lyrical beauty and intensity. His poetry is responsible for giving poetry a higher standing in American society during the 19th century, as it appealed to a wider and more diverse audience than other poets of the time. He also gave art a prominent position in his works, representing the importance of creative expression for all people. However, he may best be known for his narrative poetry, from “The Song of Hiawatha” to “Paul Revere’s Ride” to the lesser known “The Saga of King Olaf“. His ability to tell a tale, sometimes a rather epic one at that, with powerful descriptors and just the right amount of sentimentalism, has fallen out of favor with modern critical audiences.  Don’t let that fool you. Longfellow’s poems are as good as any movie, probably better.

The Wreck of the Hesperus (in part)
It was the schooner Hesperus,
      That sailed the wintry sea;
And the skipper had taken his little daughtèr,
      To bear him company.
hghgh
Blue were her eyes as the fairy-flax,
      Her cheeks like the dawn of day,
And her bosom white as the hawthorn buds,
      That ope in the month of May.
hghgh
The skipper he stood beside the helm,
      His pipe was in his mouth,
And he watched how the veering flaw did blow
      The smoke now West, now South.
hghgh
Then up and spake an old Sailòr,
      Had sailed to the Spanish Main,
“I pray thee, put into yonder port,
      For I fear a hurricane.
hghghhghgh
“Last night, the moon had a golden ring,
      And to-night no moon we see!”
The skipper, he blew a whiff from his pipe,
      And a scornful laugh laughed he.
hghgh
Colder and louder blew the wind,
      A gale from the Northeast,
The snow fell hissing in the brine,
      And the billows frothed like yeast.
hghgh
Down came the storm, and smote amain
      The vessel in its strength;
She shuddered and paused, like a frighted steed,
      Then leaped her cable’s length.

It gets better after that. Frozen corpses, praying maidens, trampling turf, and quite a bit of tragedy. The poem also gives quite a picture of the sea. Nature plays a big role in Longfellow’s tales; the landscape becomes a character in the story, sometimes even overtaking the characters. The best character in The Wreck of the Hesperus” may just be the sea itself. Read Paul Revere’s Ride” and see if the colonial town of Boston isn’t better represented than Paul Revere.

There is also much to celebrate in Longfellow’s song-like verses, his gentle moralizing, and his soft approach. Not every bit of art needs to celebrate irony and the grim realities of life; there is far too much art out there already that does just that. Longfellow’s words are sincere and simple, but that makes them accessible. The reader can sense the delight that Longfellow took in writing, how he warmed to his subjects and liked writing about them. It’s easy to see why his work appealed to the masses. His descriptions of nature, people and places are all softy done and easily read. They are so delightful that it can be hard to stop reading them at all.

Snowflakes
Out of the bosom of the Air
Out of the cloud-folds of her garments shaken,
Over the woodlands brown and bare,
 Over the harvest-fields forsaken,
    Silent, and soft, and slow
      Descends the snow.
hghgh
Even as our cloudy fancies take
 Suddenly shape in some divine expression,
Even as the troubled heart doth make
In the white countenance confession,
The troubled sky reveals
The grief it feels.
hghgh
This is the poem of the air,
Slowly in silent syllables recorded;
This is the secret of despair,
Long in its cloudy bosom hoarded,
   Now whispered and revealed
To wood and field.

Read a full biography of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and find selected poems here.

To read about using poetry to connect children to nature, check out our blog post.

Why is poetry important to science education? Find out here.

The above photo was taken by Melissa Harding.

November 25, 2013

Connecting to Nature Through Poetry: Robert Hass

by Melissa Harding

leaves

Connecting to Nature Through Poetry is a segment of the blog featuring poets who inspire their readers to establish strong connections to nature and community. An appreciation of poetry and art is connected to achievement in science and success in adult life; however, there is no need to be an expert on poetry to enjoy it. Poetry is for everyone.  As Plato once said, “Poetry is nearer to vital truth than history”.  

Poetry need supporters, people to fight for it as an important part of society. Poetry needs Robert Hass. As a poet, he is wonderful at translating the natural world into a personal history, combining descriptions of his native California countryside with autobiographical narrative. However, some of Hass’s best work may arguably be his advocacy for poetry. From 1995-1997, Hass served as the United States Poet Laureate and poetry consultant to the Library of Congress, transforming the position from one that was largely ceremonial to one that is now a public advocate for poets and their work. During his tenure as Poet Laureate, Hass visited businesses, convincing them to support poetry contests for school kids and spoke with civic groups, trying to inform them about the importance of poetry as an art. He is widely credited with being the most active poet laureate up to that time and set a high bar for those who followed.

Hass’s poems use the natural world as a backdrop for the stories he has to tell. His descriptions are vivid and beautiful, whether they are a small part of a poem or the majority of it’s content. Not typically considered a “nature poet”, Hass uses the natural world for his own purposes, different within each poem.

The Woods in New Jersey

Where there was only grey, and brownish grey,
And greyish brown against the white
Of fallen snow at twilight in the winter woods,

Now an uncanny flamelike thing, black
and sulphur-yellow, as if it were dreamed by Audubon,
Is turned upside down in a delicate cascade

Of new leaves, feeding on whatever mites
Or small white spiders haunt underleafs at stem end,
A magnolia warbler, to give the thing a name.

The other name we give this overmuch of appetite
The beauty unconscious of itself is life.
And that that kept the mind becalmed all winter? –

The more austere and abstract rhythm of the trunks,
Vertical music the cold makes visible,
That holds the whole thing up and gives it form,

or strength – call that the law. It’s made,
whatever we like to think, more of interests
than of reasons, trees reaching each their own way

for light, to make the sort of order that there is.
And what of those deer treading through the woods
In a late snowfall and silent as the snow?

Look: they move among the winter trees, so much
the color of the trees, they hardly seem to move.

Hass’s poems are conversational, as they describe his world in detail, like he is telling the reader a story at a party. He also manages to fill each one with the wisdom of someone who has “been there” before, whether or not that was a good thing. He deftly weaves his personal experience with the world in which it happens; nature is part of his life story. He writes both grand, detailed nature scenes and descriptions of the tiniest things that catch the eye – all within the context of a larger story.

Sonnet

A man talking to his ex-wife on the phone.
He has loved her voice and listens with attention
to every modulation of its tone. Knowing
it intimately. Not knowing what he wants
from the sound of it, from the rendered civility.
He studies, out the window, the seed shapes
of the broken pods of ornamental trees.
The kind that grow in everyone’s garden, that no one
but horticulturalists can name. Four arched chambers
of pale green, tiny vegetal proscenium arches,
a pair of black tapering seeds bedded in each chamber,
A wish geometry, miniature, Indian or Persian,
lovers or gods in their apartments. Outside, white,
patient animals, and tangled vines, and rain.

Read a full biography of Robert Hass and find selected poems here. To read commentaries by other poets on some of their favorite Hass poems, check out this great link.

To read about using poetry to connect children to nature, check out our blog post.

Why is poetry important to science education? Find out here.

The above photo was taken by Melissa Harding.

September 4, 2013

Connecting to Nature Through Poetry: Mary Oliver

by Melissa Harding

herons

Connecting to Nature Through Poetry is a segment of the blog featuring poets who inspire their readers to establish strong connections to nature and community. An appreciation of poetry and art is connected to achievement in science and success in adult life; however, there is no need to be an expert on poetry to enjoy it. Poetry is for everyone.  As Plato once said, “Poetry is nearer to vital truth than history”.  

Mary Oliver is a true poet of nature. Her poems speak about the natural world, from the smallest creatures to the largest questions of being alive. Some of her poems are famous enough to be printed on posters or used as quotes in email signatures, but don’t hold that against her. In her defense, they really are just that good; so good, in fact, that Oliver won a Pulitzer Prize in 1983 for her work. For people who find poetry too intangible, or perhaps too strange, Oliver’s poems are different – honest and supremely sensible. In a 2012 interview with NPR , she had this to say about her work, “One thing I do know is that poetry, to be understood, must be clear. It mustn’t be fancy. I have the feeling that a lot of poets writing now are, they sort of tap dance through it. I always feel that whatever isn’t necessary shouldn’t be in a poem.” While many poets write about the topic of nature, Oliver’s poems are so crafted that they bear reading again and again; they are never the same each time and always provoke a different corner of the heart or mind.

The Swan
Did you too see it, drifting, all night, on the black river?
Did you see it in the morning, rising into the silvery air –
An armful of white blossoms,
A perfect commotion of silk and linen as it leaned
into the bondage of its wings; a snowbank, a bank of lilies,
Biting the air with its black beak?
Did you hear it, fluting and whistling
A shrill dark music – like the rain pelting the trees – like a waterfall
Knifing down the black ledges?
And did you see it, finally, just under the clouds –
A white cross Streaming across the sky, its feet
Like black leaves, its wings Like the stretching light of the river?
And did you feel it, in your heart, how it pertained to everything?
And have you too finally figured out what beauty is for?
And have you changed your life?

Oliver’s poems remind us that we are alive and that our lives have consequence. She asks us to be mindful, of both the world around us and the one inside us. What is so refreshing about Oliver is that she asks these difficult things of us only because she has struggled with them herself. These are questions worth asking, even if the answers are hard.

Winter and the Nuthatch
Once or twice and maybe again, who knows,
the timid nuthatch will come to me
if I stand still, with something good to eat in my hand.
The first time he did it
he landed smack on his belly, as though
the legs wouldn’t cooperate. The next time
he was bolder. Then he became absolutely
wild about those walnuts.

But there was a morning I came late and, guess what,
the nuthatch was flying into a stranger’s hand.
To speak plainly, I felt betrayed.
I wanted to say: Mister,
that nuthatch and I have a relationship.
It took hours of standing in the snow
before he would drop from the tree and trust my fingers.
But I didn’t say anything.
Nobody owns the sky or the trees.
Nobody owns the hearts of birds.
Still, being human and partial therefore to my own successes—
though not resentful of others fashioning theirs—
I’ll come tomorrow, I believe, quite early.

Read a full biography of Mary Oliver and find selected poems here.

To read about using poetry to connect children to nature, check out our blog post.

Why is poetry important to science education? Find out here.

The above picture was taken by Jeff Harding.

August 20, 2013

Celebrating National Poetry Month: Using Poetry to Connect Children and Nature

by Melissa Harding

Summer Reruns: Just like your favorite television shows go on hiatus for the summer, so does the blog. We will be running eighteen summer camps in eight weeks, so we will be a little busy! In place of original posts, Tuesdays will now feature some of the blog’s most popular posts from the last year. Fridays will feature that week’s camps, with pictures, crafts and lesson ideas for parents and educators.

cherry blossoms 2

Genuine poetry can communicate before it is understood. – T.S. Eliot

April is National Poetry Month, a celebration of the richness that poetry gives to our lives. Though some may think that poetry is becoming irrelevant in our modern world, there are many more who can tell you the impact that writing or reading poetry has on their lives. In fact, poetry is an important touchstone to reality in the digital era in which we live. A poem is a powerful thing – some poems can target your soul and never let go; the same poem can give one person a feeling of peace and yet stir the passions of another. To quote Plato, “Poetry is nearer to vital truth than history.” It truly does deserve its own month of celebration.

As part of a special series focusing on modern poetry, National Public Radio offered its listeners a chance to write and submit their own poems celebrating Washington, D.C’s famous cherry blossoms in bloom. After receiving hundred of submissions, twenty of the best were selected for reprint; the three best poems were used as the inspiration for several short films.

Here are several winning entries, in no particular order:

cherry blossom 2park bench take-away
the sky and cherry blossoms
in a cup of tea
— Paul Conneally

the petals fall from
an evening cherry blossom
she kisses him first
— Jenni L. Backs

Settled on a bench
In the lilting fragrance
of cherry blossoms
— Ric Cochran

Wet April morning–
Windshield wiper blades
heavy with cherry blossoms.
— Joel Dias-Porter

streetlamps in the haze …
this morning the stone lions
catch cherry blossoms
— Judy Totts

fhfhfhfh

Just as anyone who observes the world around them is a naturalist, so too is anyone who writes a poem a poet. Writing poetry is a wonderful way to connect to nature. While it may be difficult to go outside and draw a bird that you observe, it is very easy to write a short poem about it. If you or your child are feeling intimidated by the idea of nature journaling, try writing short poems about your time outside. Don’t worry about sounding like Walt Whitman, a poem doesn’t have to be an ode to a tree. It can anything, even humorous! Poems don’t have to rhyme and can be short or long; they can be about a bird or the gum on your shoe. Children in particular may enjoy writing poems about things that are gross, weird or funny. A poem describing the wonders of rabbit poop in the yard may seem silly, but writing it requires important time spent observing.

Poetry can help to express how nature makes you feel, what you experience with your senses and what you think about your time outside; it can clarify your experience in a unique way. In fact, writing poetry about nature can be a gateway to expressing other ideas as well; poetry can be a great way for children to express things that are difficult or scary. It can be a tool to help you understand your child’s feelings as well as a way for him or her to share openly with you. Additionally, poetry is a great introduction to reading for young children and may be useful in converting reluctant readers into avid ones. The poems of Shel Silverstein are silly and fun – perfect for a child who thinks reading is boring. Finally, poems make lovely gifts; tuck one in a library book before you return it or mail one in a card. This is a great way for your child to practice random acts of kindness towards others; it is really enjoyable to sneak poems into odd places with the hope of making someone else’s day.

In short, poetry is a great tool to keep in your nature journaling toolbox as well as in your life. Be open to the idea that a poem can be anything and anywhere; the sky is the limit when writing a poem. Remember, “You will find poetry nowhere unless you bring some of it with you.” (Joseph Joubert)

If you want to get started, try some of these easy tips for writing poems with your child:
1. Exaggeration Poem: Write a crazy poem that exaggerates the attributes of an object to great lengths.
2. List Poem: Make your poem a list of all the neat things that you see, attributes of a subject, or thing you feel.
3. Stretchy Metaphor: Find five verbs and five nouns from one subject area, like nature, and use them to write about another subject, like school.
4. Point of View Poem: Write a poem from the point of view of another object, like a plant or a bird.
5. Haiku: A haiku is a three line poem with 5 syllables on the first line, 7 on the second, and 5 on the last.
6. Weather Poem: Start each line of your poem with the same phrase, like “When it rains” or “When it’s cold outside”.

To read more cherry blossom haikus and watch the accompanying videos, check out NPR’s article.

If you are looking for other ways to celebrate National Poetry Month or incorporate more poetry into your life, check out these ideas from The Academy of American Poets. Try writing a poem on the pavement or giving a poem to someone you love!

The above photos of cherry blossoms in Washington, D.C.  are courtesy of NPR.

April 18, 2013

Celebrating National Poetry Month: Using Poetry to Connect Children and Nature

by Melissa Harding

cherry blossoms 2

Genuine poetry can communicate before it is understood. – T.S. Eliot

April is National Poetry Month, a celebration of the richness that poetry gives to our lives. Though some may think that poetry is becoming irrelevant in our modern world, there are many more who can tell you the impact that writing or reading poetry has on their lives. In fact, poetry is an important touchstone to reality in the digital era in which we live. A poem is a powerful thing – some poems can target your soul and never let go; the same poem can give one person a feeling of peace and yet stir the passions of another. To quote Plato, “Poetry is nearer to vital truth than history.” It truly does deserve its own month of celebration.

As part of a special series focusing on modern poetry, National Public Radio offered its listeners a chance to write and submit their own poems celebrating Washington, D.C’s famous cherry blossoms in bloom. After receiving hundred of submissions, twenty of the best were selected for reprint; the three best poems were used as the inspiration for several short films.

Here are several winning entries, in no particular order:

cherry blossom 2park bench take-away
the sky and cherry blossoms
in a cup of tea
— Paul Conneally

the petals fall from
an evening cherry blossom
she kisses him first
— Jenni L. Backs

Settled on a bench
In the lilting fragrance
of cherry blossoms
— Ric Cochran

Wet April morning–
Windshield wiper blades
heavy with cherry blossoms.
— Joel Dias-Porter

streetlamps in the haze …
this morning the stone lions
catch cherry blossoms
— Judy Totts

fhfhfhfh

Just as anyone who observes the world around them is a naturalist, so too is anyone who writes a poem a poet. Writing poetry is a wonderful way to connect to nature. While it may be difficult to go outside and draw a bird that you observe, it is very easy to write a short poem about it. If you or your child are feeling intimidated by the idea of nature journaling, try writing short poems about your time outside. Don’t worry about sounding like Walt Whitman, a poem doesn’t have to be an ode to a tree. It can anything, even humorous! Poems don’t have to rhyme and can be short or long; they can be about a bird or the gum on your shoe. Children in particular may enjoy writing poems about things that are gross, weird or funny. A poem describing the wonders of rabbit poop in the yard may seem silly, but writing it requires important time spent observing.

Poetry can help to express how nature makes you feel, what you experience with your senses and what you think about your time outside; it can clarify your experience in a unique way. In fact, writing poetry about nature can be a gateway to expressing other ideas as well; poetry can be a great way for children to express things that are difficult or scary. It can be a tool to help you understand your child’s feelings as well as a way for him or her to share openly with you. Additionally, poetry is a great introduction to reading for young children and may be useful in converting reluctant readers into avid ones. The poems of Shel Silverstein are silly and fun – perfect for a child who thinks reading is boring. Finally, poems make lovely gifts; tuck one in a library book before you return it or mail one in a card. This is a great way for your child to practice random acts of kindness towards others; it is really enjoyable to sneak poems into odd places with the hope of making someone else’s day.

In short, poetry is a great tool to keep in your nature journaling toolbox as well as in your life. Be open to the idea that a poem can be anything and anywhere; the sky is the limit when writing a poem. Remember, “You will find poetry nowhere unless you bring some of it with you.” (Joseph Joubert)

If you want to get started, try some of these easy tips for writing poems with your child:
1. Exaggeration Poem: Write a crazy poem that exaggerates the attributes of an object to great lengths.
2. List Poem: Make your poem a list of all the neat things that you see, attributes of a subject, or thing you feel.
3. Stretchy Metaphor: Find five verbs and five nouns from one subject area, like nature, and use them to write about another subject, like school.
4. Point of View Poem: Write a poem from the point of view of another object, like a plant or a bird.
5. Haiku: A haiku is a three line poem with 5 syllables on the first line, 7 on the second, and 5 on the last.
6. Weather Poem: Start each line of your poem with the same phrase, like “When it rains” or “When it’s cold outside”.

To read more cherry blossom haikus and watch the accompanying videos, check out NPR’s article.

If you are looking for other ways to celebrate National Poetry Month or incorporate more poetry into your life, check out these ideas from The Academy of American Poets. Try writing a poem on the pavement or giving a poem to someone you love!

The above photos of cherry blossoms in Washington, D.C.  are courtesy of NPR.

March 22, 2013

Weekend Nature Challenge: Haikus for Spring

by Melissa Harding

DSC_7297-1

Green grass in April
Birds begin to sing in trees
Children playing outside
hfhfhf

Birds and bees flying
Soft blades of grass on my feet
New flowers blooming
fhfhf

I hear birds singing.
Birds are chirping everywhere.
Their wings touch the sky.

(Three spring haikus from the third graders at Pocantico Hills School)
c
Spring has finally found its way to Pittsburgh. After all of the snow and cold that we have had around here this winter, it is about time! In celebration of spring being sprung, we would like to challenge you to write a nature haiku with your child this weekend. A haiku is a poem written in three simple lines. The only catch is that each line has a certain number of syllables, 5-7-5, to be exact. So short that it can be said in one breath, it is meant to capture a moment in time. See the above examples for inspiration.

jgjgj
Take the next few days to explore your neighborhood and then send us your captured moments in haiku form.
What new things did you discover with your child? Tell us in the comments below.

The above photo of a sprouting crocus is copyrighted by Molly Steinwald.

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