Posts tagged ‘native plants’

April 30, 2013

Follow the Fellows: Learning How Invasive Plants Affect Butterfly Populations

by Melissa Harding

Davis head photo new

The Botany in Action Fellowship program at Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens fosters the development of a next generation of plant-based scientists who are committed, first, to excellent research, and second, to educational outreach. Open to PhD students enrolled at US graduate institutions and conducting plant-based scientific field research, the BIA program provides Fellows with funding for use towards field research in the US or abroad and a trip to Phipps, to engage in science outreach training and opportunities to share his or her research to public audiences.

Current BIA Fellows are engaged in research in locales from Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Maryland, and Illinois to Nepal, India, and Brazil. Their work covers topics ranging from the role of green roofs in urban biodiversity and the influence of heavy metal soil pollution on plants and pollinators to identification of plants used by healers that protect brain cells from the progression of Parkinson’s disease

November’s featured fellow is Samantha Davis. Samantha is PhD student at Wright State University in Ohio. She is researching how garlic mustard, an invasive plant that occurs all over the northeast, is influencing a rare butterfly, the West Virginia White. Garlic mustard is ruining many of our natural areas. Sam’s work can help discover how and why garlic mustard affects our ecosystem, and what we can do to prevent more damage.

Read an update on Sam’s research and life as a scientist at the Botany In Action website! You can also learn more about her work on her blog, Tracking the West Virgina White.

You can follow Sam and all of the BIA as they study plants across the US and across the world at the Follow the Fellows section of our Botany In Action website.

The following Botany In Action update was written by Amanda Joy, Botany in Action Fellowship coordinator.

The above image was provided by Samantha Davis.

March 21, 2013

Follow the Fellows: Understanding the Link Between Indigenous People and Native Ecology

by Melissa Harding

anita-varghese2

The Botany in Action Fellowship program at Phipps fosters the development of the next generation of plant-based scientists who are committed to both excellent research and educational outreach. Open to PhD students enrolled at US graduate institutions, the BIA program provides Fellows with funding for use towards scientific research in the US or abroad and a trip to Phipps, to engage in science outreach training and opportunities to share his or her research to public audiences.

Current BIA Fellows are engaged in local research in Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Maryland and research abroad in Nepal, Thailand and India. Their work covers topics ranging from the role of green roof plants in urban storm water management and the effects of plant invasion on a rare woodland butterfly to identification of plants used by healers for treatment of dementia.

March’s featured fellow is Anita Varghese. Anita is PhD student in Botany at the University of Hawaii. She has lived and worked in the Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve Western Ghats, India since 1993, after completing her Masters in Ecology. Anita is interested in the relationship between ecology of forests and indigenous people. Her research focuses on the reasons why some people in India choose to remain harvesters of medicinal plants and forest products, while others are moving away from livelihoods that depend on forest resources. Her research combines the knowledge of native people with scientific studies to produce a comprehensive understanding of plant species to aid in conservation.

Read an update on Anita’s research and life as a scientist at the Botany In Action website!
You can follow Anita and all of the BIA as they study plants across the US and across the world at Follow the Fellows.

The following Botany In Action update was written by Amanda Joy, Botany in Action Fellowship coordinator.

The above image was provided by Anita Verghese.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 199 other followers

%d bloggers like this: