Archive for ‘Interview with a scientist’

April 18, 2014

Interview with a Scientist: BIA Fellow, Aurelie Jacquet

by Melissa Harding

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 If there is one segment of society that is often misunderstood, it is people who work in science fields. Public perception of scientists tends to lean towards lab coats, crazy hair and beakers full of chemicals, especially in the eyes of children.  In reality, most scientists are just regular people who want to make the world a better place through scientific discovery. The best way to dispel the myth that scientists are boring or crazy is to get to know them; the purpose of this segment is to talk with real scientists to ask them what they love about their jobs and why they think their work is fun and important.

For our fifth installment in this series, we sat down with BIA Fellow Aurélie Jacquet. The Botany in Action Fellowship program at Phipps fosters the development of the next generation of plant-based scientists who are committed, first, to excellent research, and second, to educational outreach. The BIA program provides Fellows with funding for use towards field research in the US or abroad and a trip to Phipps, to engage in science outreach training and opportunities to share his or her research to public audiences. Aurélie is in her second year as a BIA Fellow, studying the effects of medicinal plants on Parkinson’s Disease.

We interviewed Aurélie about her interests in medicinal plants and why studying science is important:

1. Describe your work.
My name is Aurélie Jacquet and I am a Ph.D student at Purdue University. I come from France and I have decided to do my research in the USA to discover a new culture and get the opportunity to make an impact in our world. As a kid I used to travel and spend a lot of time exploring outside, so my interest in bringing plant, people and science together may come from this period. I study the medicinal plants used in Nepalese and Native American traditional medicine to cure Parkinson’s disease. I visited various areas in Nepal as well as the Blackfeet (Montana) and Lumbee (North Carolina) tribes in the USA. In Nepal and in the USA, I interviewed  traditional healers as well as local people and collected plant samples. These samples are then analyzed in my lab to identify therapeutic activities. Parkinson’s disease is an age-related disorder and no therapies are currently available to cure this disease. This work aims at discovering plant-based therapeutics that would be easily available for people in Nepal and developing countries. Today, 80% of the people in the world use medicinal plants as primary source of health care and don’t have access to modern medicine. Discovering new plant-based therapies would critically impact people’s life by providing cost effective and sustainable medicines. On the other hand, this work could lead to the formulation of more modern drugs and impact our own lives and our families. We are all inhabitants of this world and we all have a role to play to make it better for now and the future.
2. Why did you become a scientist?
I became a scientist because since I was a teenager I was interested in studying how people use medicinal plants in traditional medicine. I believed we could study these herbs and make medicines for all.
3. What is your favorite part about being a scientist?
I like to be able to meet general audiences and explain why traditional medicine and herbs are important and need to be protected.
4. What is the most important quality in a scientist?
Be passionate and relentless. Science is not an easy and smooth path. There is always a lot of time spent in optimizing experiments and it takes a lot of time to obtain results, especially in biology and pharmacology.
5. What is the coolest thing you have ever done at work?
Last summer, I traveled to Montana to meet the Blackfeet tribe. As part of my ‘education’ and spiritual experience with the tribe, I was offered to smoke the sacred pipe! During this time, I was able to learn about the meaning of the plants used during ceremonies and rituals.
6. If you weren’t a scientist, what other job would you want to do?
I would be a nature photographer or reporter in developing countries.
7. What are your hobbies outside of your research?
Photography and hiking
8. Why is science important?
Science is important because it helps us understand the world around us, protect endangered species, preserve knowledge but also help design medicines to cure terrible diseases such as Parkinson’s disease or malaria.
9. Why is it important for kids to learn science?
It is important for kids to learn science for various reasons. First, it helps build a “scientific mind”, which is critical to be able to analyze information rationally. Secondly, science helps understand how the world functions around us. It can be learning about the various families of plants, butterflies or why the planets turn around the sun! Finally, I have been judge for the Lafayette Regional Science and Engineering fair for 2 years, and I listen to kids’ presentation about a scientific project they build and conducted. I believe that they enjoy being able to independently create and lead a project, present their results and draw conclusions. It helps them thinking independently and increases their self-confidence.

Aurélie is an example of a scientists drawn to their field by their desire to help others. Science for its own sake is great, but learning more about the world for the purpose of making it better is the very best use of scientific research.

To learn more about Aurélie’s work, check out her Follow the Fellows page on the Botany in Action Website.
To see more of Aurélie’s photography, check out her website!

The above photo was taken by Amanda Joy.

March 13, 2014

Interview with a Scientist: BIA Fellow, Anna Johnson

by Melissa Harding

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If there is one segment of society that is often misunderstood, it is people who work in science fields. Public perception of scientists tends to lean towards lab coats, crazy hair and beakers full of chemicals, especially in the eyes of children.  In reality, most scientists are just regular people who want to make the world a better place through scientific discovery. The best way to dispel the myth that scientists are boring or crazy is to get to know them; the purpose of this segment is to talk with real scientists to ask them what they love about their jobs and why they think their work is fun and important.

For our forth installment in this series, we sat down with BIA Fellow Anna Johnson. The Botany in Action Fellowship program at Phipps fosters the development of the next generation of plant-based scientists who are committed, first, to excellent research, and second, to educational outreach. The BIA program provides Fellows with funding for use towards field research in the US or abroad and a trip to Phipps, to engage in science outreach training and opportunities to share his or her research to public audiences. Anna is in her first year as a BIA Fellow, studying urban biodiversity.

We interviewed Anna about her love of teaching science, her time working with inmates, and why learning science helps kids to feel empowered.

1. Describe your work:
I study the ecological processes that drive patterns of urban biodiversity. I am particularly interested in connecting ecological research results to urban sustainability initiatives, and engaging underserved populations in the practice and outcomes of research. My research advisor and I are currently working on a long-term project with other academic, non-profit and governmental collaborators to set up and maintain experimental restorations of native plant communities in vacant lots found in low-income neighborhoods in Baltimore City.
2. Why did you become a scientist?
I went to college for a general liberal arts degree (a bachelor of arts), but fell in love with the natural history component of my freshman introductory biology lab. This inspired me to intern during a following summer as an environmental educator at a nature center on the Chesapeake Bay. But, I quickly became frustrated by all the things I didn’t know about the ecosystems I was showing to the children I worked with. In the process of educating myself to teach lessons, I realized that being a scientist involved thinking creatively and asking the sorts of questions I was most interested in already, and that it wasn’t “too hard” or “boring” at all. So I worked in an evolutionary ecology research lab for a few years after college, and then applied to get my PhD in ecology.
3. What is your favorite part about being a scientist?
I love getting to spend time with other scientists who are passionate about systems that I don’t study and don’t know much about. I am a plant ecologist but I go to school in a geography department with a wide range of researchers–I never thought I would find meteorology, hydrology or geology interesting (I like things that are alive!), but watching friends get really excited about stream flow models or hurricane trajectories helps me keep an open mind and notice connections I wouldn’t think about on my own.
4. What is the most important quality in a scientist?
Being able to think creatively and independently
5. What is the coolest thing you have ever done at work?
Well, the coolest thing lately is that I got to spend a day last week at the Maryland Transition Center in Baltimore City, building a greenhouse and planting seeds with a group of inmates—something I never imagined I would be doing when I went back to school. Also, I’m responding to these survey questions from Germany, where I’m attending an international ecology conference—science is a great excuse to travel.
6. If you weren’t a scientist, what other job would you want to do?
For a while I thought I wanted to be a botanical illustrator but I realized that I don’t have the patience or consistent attention to fine detail       that this requires. I would probably either want to teach middle school or work in local government; anything that is hands-on and involves some story-telling and arguing.
7. What are your hobbies outside of  your research?
I read a lot of novels, garden/do battle with roving herds of urban deer and spend time with family and friends. I also love exploring my two       favorite cities, Baltimore and Pittsburgh.
8. Why is science important?
Science is a system for understanding the world around us, not just a collection of facts. Thinking scientifically helps us to ask meaningful questions and productively explore the causes and consequences of our actions as a society.
9. Why is it important for kids to learn science?
Science is empowering! We live in a complex world and science is about problem-solving. It helps kids to put together the pieces and start to make “educated guesses” about what will happen next and why things are the way they are. Science makes really little things not so insignificant and really big things not so overwhelming because it places them all in the context of human concerns.

Anna is an example of someone who loved learning about science so much that she quit her job as a teacher to pursue it full-time. She not only gets to spend her days researching her passions, but she also has an appreciation for the research of others. Life-long learning is something that we all strive for, whether or not we are scientists. To learn more about how science communication creates life-long learners, check out this post.

To learn more about Anna’s work, check out her Follow the Fellows page on the Botany in Action Website.

The above photo was taken by Amanda Joy.

January 31, 2014

Interview with a Scientist: BIA Fellow Kelly Ksiazek

by Melissa Harding

Phipps Science Education_BIA (3)

If there is one segment of society that is often misunderstood, it is people who work in science fields. Public perception of scientists tends to lean towards lab coats, crazy hair and beakers full of chemicals, especially in the eyes of children.  In reality, most scientists are just regular people who want to make the world a better place through scientific discovery. The best way to dispel the myth that scientists are boring or crazy is to get to know them; the purpose of this segment is to talk with real scientists to ask them what they love about their jobs and why they think their work is fun and important.

For our third installment in this series, we sat down with BIA Fellow Kelly Ksiazek. The Botany in Action Fellowship program at Phipps fosters the development of the next generation of plant-based scientists who are committed, first, to excellent research, and second, to educational outreach. The BIA program provides Fellows with funding for use towards field research in the US or abroad and a trip to Phipps, to engage in science outreach training and opportunities to share his or her research to public audiences. Kelly is in her second year as a BIA Fellow, researching green roofs in Chicago.

We interviewed Kelly about the importance of scientists being honest about their work, her former job as a science teacher and why science is important.

1. Describe your work:
People know me as a very organized researcher, teacher and graduate student. I am proud to be from Chicago, IL and love that I get to learn about plant ecology in the city that I call home. I am a PhD student at Northwestern University and the Chicago Botanic Garden where I also earned my Master’s degree in Plant Biology and Conservation. I am currently determining which combinations of local plant species can live together on green roofs. Green roofs are rooftops were many plants can grow. In addition to providing habitat for plants, birds, and insects, these special habitats can help hold stormwater, filter pollutants from the air, and decrease the heating and cooling costs of a building.

As a scientist, I work with many people from the community like naturalists, roofing specialists, and building mangers. I get to travel to some of the most beautiful natural areas and urban green roofs to collect my data. I also spend time in a lab working with student interns and other volunteers cleaning seeds, identifying bees, and running chemical tests on soil samples. My goal is to have my findings to inform how green roofs are used in North America and increase city-wide greening and environmental awareness efforts. Supporting native plant and animal species in cities is essential for the current and future health of all living things on the planet.
2. Why did you become a scientist?
I don’t know why I never thought about being a scientist when I was growing up. Science was always my favorite subject in school but it wasn’t until I was a high school biology teacher that I really knew that I wanted to do more than help other people learn about science: I wanted to do it myself! When I had to learn more about ecology and plants so I could teach my students about these topics, I became fascinated with the field and knew that I wouldn’t be happy unless I was a scientist, making discoveries for myself.
3. What is your favorite part about being a scientist?
I love that I get to learn new things every day and that I get to search for answers to questions I have about the ecology in my city.
4. What is the most important quality in a scientist?
Honesty is the most important quality in a scientist. Sometimes when you are expecting a certain result from an experiment, it might be tempting to ignore a small piece of data or analyze numbers in a certain incorrect way so that your experimental results say what you want them to say. But this kind of dishonesty doesn’t help you or the rest of society really understand the true nature of things. As a scientist, you have to be able to admit when you’re wrong and always carry out your work with integrity and honesty.
5. What is the coolest thing you have ever done at work?
I was giving a presentation about my research in France and was invited to go on a tour of some green roofs in Paris. I got to take a special tour of the green roof on top of the Chaillot Palace, right across the river from the Eiffel Tower!
6. If you weren’t a scientist, what other job would you want to do?
If I wasn’t a scientist I would want to be a science teacher again so I could help others learn how cool science really is!
7. What are your hobbies outside of your research?
I really like traveling, camping, gardening, cooking, going to concerts and finding excuses to be outside as much as possible.
8. Why is science important?
Although the world is changing so quickly these days, science helps us understand it. Science helps us have clean air and water, enough food to eat and comfortable living spaces. Especially with the population of the world growing so fast, science is important to help us live together with the animals, plants, and other organisms on the planet.
9. Why is it important for kids to learn science?
Kids should learn about science so they can understand how their world works. If they learn how to ask good questions and identify the difference between fact and fiction when they’re young, hopefully they will continue to make discoveries and know how to make educated decisions later in life.

Kelly is an example of someone who loved teaching about science so much that she just had to do it herself! Her background as a former teachers helps inform her ability to communicate her work to others, which is the foundation of what the BIA program is all about. To learn more about the importance of science communication, check out this post.

To learn more about Kelly’s work, check out her Follow the Fellows page on the Botany in Action Website.

The above photo was taken by Amanda Joy.

January 27, 2014

Understanding the Human Connection to American Ginseng

by Melissa Harding

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BIA Fellow Jessi Turner shares with us her love of ginseng and her commitment to its preservation in this following essay. Thanks to Jessi for sharing her story and helping us understand the human connection to this great plant!

I will never forget the first time I saw American ginseng.  It was in the last daylight hours of a chilly, early September day; my older brother and I put on our flannels as we walked into the woods.  “Here it is,” he pointed at the small, unassuming plant with bright red berries, “Green Gold.” After I looked at the three prongs, each with the compound whorl of leaflets, Joshua bent down, took the bright red berries and planted them. Then he used a small shovel, slowly digging it into the soil, and he exposed a dirty, beige root.  I remember how excited he was to show me how to “go ‘sanging” (or hunt for ginseng.)  He later took it into the basement, and among others, placed it out to dry.

ginesng 2I have always been fascinated by medicinal plants, and ginseng was no exception. The international connection of this plant is second to none. Locally, people harvest with their family and friends to earn a valuable second income.  After these roots are sold, they end up in Hong Kong, and sold for traditional Chinese medicine.  Ginseng is considered a cure-all, an aphrodisiac, and an energizer (let’s be honest, ginseng basically sells itself!).  The mere fact that this moment with my brother would influence the market on the other side of the world, is still a concept that amazes me.

Wild American ginseng can sell for hundreds of dollars a pound, and it has been harvested readily since the 1700’s.  Ginseng harvest is an important tradition of Appalachian culture.  However, ginseng faces a host of pressures: unethical harvest (out of season, taking non-reproductive plants, taking plants that are too small), climate change, deer browse, and loss of habitat from conversion of forests to other types of land use.  Without sustainable practices, ginseng will likely go extinct.
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In order to conserve ginseng for future generations, there should be a push to ethically harvest and steward populations of ginseng.  This is an easy process:
1. Familiarize yourself on Ginseng Harvest Laws in your state.
2. Always ask permission, or acquire the proper permits, to harvest if it isn’t on your property.
3. Harvest only 25% of all mature plants in a population (3 to 4 prong plants) that have red fruit.
4. Plant the seeds near the host plant, make sure the seeds are about an inch deep in the soil.
5. Plant any seeds from any plant, even if you do not harvest the plant.

ginseng 3These days, I still go out in the woods yearly with family members.  As my brother joined the AirForce and moved away, I now go out with my parents.  Both are skilled at finding ginseng.  In late August, when the berries are red, we go looking for plants.  As I study ginseng conservation, rather than harvest the plant, the thrill for us is finding these rare plants. I like to think we do a catch and release program.  After we find ginseng, we plant the berries, 2 cm into the dirt, and then carefully cut off the plant at the stem (to keep illegal harvesters from finding the plant and digging it up.)  Since it is the end of the season, the plants have enough energy from the summer, and the tops are no longer needed- plus, we collect the leaves to use them in tea.  Over the past few years, we have seen populations of ginseng in the areas we visit increase dramatically. Ginseng is a very special plant that reminds me of great memories with my family and friends.  As it is a species that is economically, culturally, and medicinally importance on an international scale, we need to conserve it for future generations.

For more information, please visit www.wildginsengconservation.com and watch the following video: How to Steward your Ginseng Population.  

 Learn more about Jessi at her website and follow her work with Phipps with our Follow the Fellows feature!

The above photos were all provided courtesy of Jessi Turner.

December 6, 2013

Interview with a Scientist: BIA Fellow Anita Varghese

by Melissa Harding

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If there is one segment of society that is often misunderstood, it is people who work in science fields. Public perception of scientists tends to lean towards lab coats, crazy hair and beakers full of chemicals, especially in the eyes of children.  In reality, most scientists are just regular people who want to make the world a better place through scientific discovery. The best way to dispel the myth that scientists are boring or crazy is to get to know them; the purpose of this segment is to talk with real scientists to ask them what they love about their jobs and why they think their work is fun and important.

For our second interview, we sat down with BIA Fellow Anita Varghese. The Botany in Action Fellowship program at Phipps fosters the development of the next generation of plant-based scientists who are committed, first, to excellent research, and second, to educational outreach. The BIA program provides Fellows with funding for use towards field research in the US or abroad and a trip to Phipps, to engage in science outreach training and opportunities to share his or her research to public audiences. Anita is in her third year as a BIA Fellow, studying biodiversity in the Western Ghats of India.

We interviewed Anita about why curiosity is important, her favorite part of her job and her experience crossing a river on a bamboo pole.

  1. Describe your work: Most of the world’s remaining biodiversity occurs in human forest landscapes and its conservation requires participation of local communities. My research focuses on the Western Ghats biodiversity hotspot in India, and seeks to establish linkages between the ecology of wild harvested plants, the ecosystems where they are found, and the knowledge of indigenous gatherers. The Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve, which lies within the Western Ghats is home to more than 20 indigenous forest dependent groups who derive a part of their livelihood from collection of forest produce. These forest products range from leaves, barks, seeds, fruits, resin and animal products like honey. My research objectives are to assess the impact of resin harvest methods on the biology of Canarium strictum (Burseraceae), an evergreen forest tree also called the Black Dammer tree. I am also keen to understand the factors that shape indigenous people’s motivation to be gatherers of forest produce. Finally I want to understand what indicators do the indigenous people use to predict ecological changes either to the forest produce or to its habitat.
  2. Why did you become a scientist?
    Nature and the love for nature is what made me an ecologist. By the time I finished my Masters in Ecology I felt I had enough of textbook knowledge and wanted to work to apply this knowledge. As I continue to work for the Keystone Foundation, an eco-development NGO, I combine my conservation action with research and I am using my PhD to work out a balance between the two.
  3. What is your favorite part about being a scientist?
    My favorite part about being an ecologist is that I get to do my research and science outdoors.
  4. What is the most important quality in a scientist?
    To accept that you are engaged in understanding only a part of the puzzle
  5. What is the coolest thing you have ever done at work?
    Working in the forests in the tropics has several adventures, but I think the one that I don’t want to do again is walking on a bamboo pole across a 30m wide river in the peak of the monsoons! There were no life jackets, no harnesses not even a decent side railing to the bamboo pole which was the bridge.
  6. If you weren’t a scientist, what other job would you want to do?
    Teach science to school children
  7. What are your hobbies outside of your research?
    Playing the piano
  8. Why is science important?
    Science is all around us and very much a part of our daily lives. We do need more people to do science to set right some of the wrongs that we have done to the planet.
  9. Why is it important for kids to learn science?
    Curiosity is most alive in a child and that is the starting point for science. Some of the best science is done by asking the most basic questions. So I feel children have it in them to do science, we have made science so restricted that children are terrified of it.

Anita is someone who sees science all around her every day and wants to use her research to make the world a better place. She is also an example of someone who combines art and science together in her life. To learn more about the role that art plays in science, check out this post.

To learn more about Anita’s work, check out her Follow the Fellows page on the Botany in Action Website.

The above photo was taken by Amanda Joy.

November 25, 2013

Innovations for America’s Electricity Grid: Talk with the National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Engineering Ambassadors

by Melissa Harding

Holiday lights and cell phones need it. So do digital music, movies, games, and toys. Electricity is essential to modern life – at home, at work and at play. But the electricity grid that keeps our world running smoothly is based on century-old technology that is increasingly ill suited to modern needs. Join us as two leading grid engineers talk about innovations being developed here in Pittsburgh to retool the grid for the 21st century.

Phipps Winter Lights - Paul g Weigman

WHO: National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Engineering Science & Engineering Ambassadors

WHAT: Innovations for America’s Electricity Grid – An Informal Conversation. Join us for complimentary drinks, hors d’oeuvres, and a conversation with leading Pittsburgh energy experts.

Panelists: Greg Reed and Emmanuel Taylor, Swanson School of Engineering, University of Pittsburgh

WHEN: Friday, December 13, 2013, 6:00 PM

WHERE: Phipps Conservatory – Center for Sustainable Landscapes – Classroom & Atrium (1st Floor)

Free and open to the public. (Admission to the gardens not included.)

This event is part of the Science & Engineering Ambassadors program – an activity of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) – to connect opinion leaders with local experts, building relationships at the community level on the topic of energy. The NAS and NAE are private, non-profit societies of distinguished scholars engaged in scientific and engineering research, dedicated to the furtherance of science and technology and to their use for the public good.

Space is limited; RSVP required.

RSVP or send inquiries to: Sam Taylor, Director, Science & Engineering Ambassadors, atstaylor@nas.edu.

NOTE: If you have questions about the electricity grid and our electricity supply that you would like to be addressed in this presentation, please email them in advance to staylor@nas.edu.

For additional background information, watch Greg and Emmanuel’s talk at TEDxPittsburgh.

The above photo was taken by Paul g. Weigman.

October 23, 2013

Interview with a Scientist: BIA Fellow George Meindl

by Melissa Harding

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“Interview with a Scientist” is a new feature in which we sit down with scientists and learn what makes them love their jobs.

If there is one segment of society that is often misunderstood, it is people who work in science fields. Public perception of scientists tends to lean towards lab coats, crazy hair and beakers full of chemicals, especially in the eyes of children.  In reality, most scientists are just regular people who happen to be passionate about plants, brains, or DNA and who want to make the world a better place through scientific discovery. The best way to dispel the myth that scientists are boring or crazy is to get to know them; the purpose of this new segment is to talk with real scientists to ask them what they love about their jobs and why they think their work is fun and important.

Starting us off is a scientist from the University of Pittsburgh –  Botany in Action Fellow, George Meindl. The Botany in Action Fellowship program at Phipps fosters the development of the next generation of plant-based scientists who are committed, first, to excellent research, and second, to educational outreach. The BIA program provides Fellows with funding for use towards field research in the US or abroad and a trip to Phipps, to engage in science outreach training and opportunities to share his or her research to public audiences. George is in his second year as a BIA Fellow, studying heavy metal contaminants and their effect on the ecosystem.

We interviewed George about why science matters, why being a scientist is fun, and growing up near the Sierra Nevada Mountains.

  1. Describe your work:
    As a PhD student at the University of Pittsburgh, I study the movement of toxic heavy metals through ecosystems.  Pollution resulting from coal and mineral mining has left many natural environments contaminated with heavy metals, which may negatively affect both plants and animals that live nearby.  Some plants, however, are known to accumulate soil contaminants and thus may be used in efforts to clean polluted soils.  Unfortunately, these metal-accumulating plants may negatively affect pollinators and herbivores, which feed on plant tissue, if they eat them.  Understanding the fate of environmental contaminants is vital for land managers whose goal is to clean contaminated soils without negatively affecting surrounding wildlife.
  2. Why did you become a scientist?
    Growing up near the Sierra Nevada mountain range, I have always enjoyed being outside, and this general interest in nature developed into a scientific career.
  3. What is your favorite part about being a scientist?
    Field work.  Just like when I was young, I enjoy myself most when I am outside, observing nature in action.
  4. What is the most important quality in a scientist?
    Dedication.  Things will not always go to plan, and one must be willing to keep working despite difficulty.
  5. What is the coolest thing you have ever done at work?
    Hiked the Pacific Crest Trail as a Master’s student while conducting fieldwork.
  6. If you weren’t a scientist, what other job would you want to do?
    Professional athlete.
  7. What are your hobbies outside of your research?
    Hiking, camping, sports in general.
  8. Why is science important?
    Science is important because it helps us understand natural processes (for example, plant growth), which can then lead to an improved quality of life for humans (for example, increased crop yield).
  9. Why is it important for kids to learn science?
    If children are taught the importance of science and the scientific process at a young age, then they will fully develop their skills as problem solvers and critical thinkers.

George is a great example of someone who became invested in science from an early age. His childhood playing outside helped him to develop an appreciation of nature that eventually lead to a career in environmental research. To learn more about the importance of outdoor experiences in creating an appreciation of nature in children, check out this post.

To learn more about George’s work, check out his Follow the Fellows page on the Botany in Action Website.

The above photo was taken by Amanda Joy.

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