Archive for ‘botany’

April 18, 2014

Interview with a Scientist: BIA Fellow, Aurelie Jacquet

by Melissa Harding

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 If there is one segment of society that is often misunderstood, it is people who work in science fields. Public perception of scientists tends to lean towards lab coats, crazy hair and beakers full of chemicals, especially in the eyes of children.  In reality, most scientists are just regular people who want to make the world a better place through scientific discovery. The best way to dispel the myth that scientists are boring or crazy is to get to know them; the purpose of this segment is to talk with real scientists to ask them what they love about their jobs and why they think their work is fun and important.

For our fifth installment in this series, we sat down with BIA Fellow Aurélie Jacquet. The Botany in Action Fellowship program at Phipps fosters the development of the next generation of plant-based scientists who are committed, first, to excellent research, and second, to educational outreach. The BIA program provides Fellows with funding for use towards field research in the US or abroad and a trip to Phipps, to engage in science outreach training and opportunities to share his or her research to public audiences. Aurélie is in her second year as a BIA Fellow, studying the effects of medicinal plants on Parkinson’s Disease.

We interviewed Aurélie about her interests in medicinal plants and why studying science is important:

1. Describe your work.
My name is Aurélie Jacquet and I am a Ph.D student at Purdue University. I come from France and I have decided to do my research in the USA to discover a new culture and get the opportunity to make an impact in our world. As a kid I used to travel and spend a lot of time exploring outside, so my interest in bringing plant, people and science together may come from this period. I study the medicinal plants used in Nepalese and Native American traditional medicine to cure Parkinson’s disease. I visited various areas in Nepal as well as the Blackfeet (Montana) and Lumbee (North Carolina) tribes in the USA. In Nepal and in the USA, I interviewed  traditional healers as well as local people and collected plant samples. These samples are then analyzed in my lab to identify therapeutic activities. Parkinson’s disease is an age-related disorder and no therapies are currently available to cure this disease. This work aims at discovering plant-based therapeutics that would be easily available for people in Nepal and developing countries. Today, 80% of the people in the world use medicinal plants as primary source of health care and don’t have access to modern medicine. Discovering new plant-based therapies would critically impact people’s life by providing cost effective and sustainable medicines. On the other hand, this work could lead to the formulation of more modern drugs and impact our own lives and our families. We are all inhabitants of this world and we all have a role to play to make it better for now and the future.
2. Why did you become a scientist?
I became a scientist because since I was a teenager I was interested in studying how people use medicinal plants in traditional medicine. I believed we could study these herbs and make medicines for all.
3. What is your favorite part about being a scientist?
I like to be able to meet general audiences and explain why traditional medicine and herbs are important and need to be protected.
4. What is the most important quality in a scientist?
Be passionate and relentless. Science is not an easy and smooth path. There is always a lot of time spent in optimizing experiments and it takes a lot of time to obtain results, especially in biology and pharmacology.
5. What is the coolest thing you have ever done at work?
Last summer, I traveled to Montana to meet the Blackfeet tribe. As part of my ‘education’ and spiritual experience with the tribe, I was offered to smoke the sacred pipe! During this time, I was able to learn about the meaning of the plants used during ceremonies and rituals.
6. If you weren’t a scientist, what other job would you want to do?
I would be a nature photographer or reporter in developing countries.
7. What are your hobbies outside of your research?
Photography and hiking
8. Why is science important?
Science is important because it helps us understand the world around us, protect endangered species, preserve knowledge but also help design medicines to cure terrible diseases such as Parkinson’s disease or malaria.
9. Why is it important for kids to learn science?
It is important for kids to learn science for various reasons. First, it helps build a “scientific mind”, which is critical to be able to analyze information rationally. Secondly, science helps understand how the world functions around us. It can be learning about the various families of plants, butterflies or why the planets turn around the sun! Finally, I have been judge for the Lafayette Regional Science and Engineering fair for 2 years, and I listen to kids’ presentation about a scientific project they build and conducted. I believe that they enjoy being able to independently create and lead a project, present their results and draw conclusions. It helps them thinking independently and increases their self-confidence.

Aurélie is an example of a scientists drawn to their field by their desire to help others. Science for its own sake is great, but learning more about the world for the purpose of making it better is the very best use of scientific research.

To learn more about Aurélie’s work, check out her Follow the Fellows page on the Botany in Action Website.
To see more of Aurélie’s photography, check out her website!

The above photo was taken by Amanda Joy.

April 9, 2014

2014 Botany in Action Fellows Announced!

by Melissa Harding

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The 2014 Botany in Action Fellows have been selected!

The Botany in Action Fellowship program at Phipps fosters the development of the next generation of plant-based scientists who are committed both to excellent research and educational outreach. Open to PhD students enrolled at US graduate institutions and conducting plant-based scientific field research, the BIA program provides Fellows with funding for use towards field research in the US or abroad and a trip to Phipps, to engage in science outreach training and opportunities to share his or her research with a broad range of public audiences.

Here are the 2014 Fellows; some are returning and some are brand new:

Jacquet head photoAURELIE JACQUET, Purdue University (IN).  Neuroprotective activities of Nepalese and Native American traditional medicines in Parkinson’s disease. (Nepal and United States). related symptoms. We overall documented more than 300 uses, but we need to spend more time with the Lumbee people to provide a more complete overview of their medicine. Because herbal medicine is sacred and secret among people of the tribe, information about these practices is only shared after a trust relationship is established between the healer and the researcher. Our central hypothesis is that the plants used in Nepalese and Native American traditional medicines have a high potential to alleviate neuron death and changes in brain cells associated with PD. We collected medicinal plants and are conducting controlled tests to determine the safety and therapeutic efficacy of the samples.
Our research contributes to meet the United Nations’ Millennium Development Goal #1 “Eradicate poverty and hunger” through generation of knowledge capable of initiating new discussions in the field of public health policy, and the preservation of traditional practices.
Research Advisor: Jean-Christophe Rochet, Associate Professor of Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Purdue University.

Learn more about Aurelie and her research here.

Johnson_HeadshotANNA JOHNSON, University of Maryland Baltimore County (MD), Biodiversity in the City: the Interactive Effects of Land-Use Legacies and Environmental Gradients on the Diversity of Fragmented Urban Plant Communities (MD). While most of the global human population lives in cities, our urban ecosystems remain one of the more understudied environments from the perspective of ecological science. We rely on the plants that grow in cities to provide services to the human population such as cooling and cleaning the air and making our neighborhoods more beautiful. We know relatively little, however, about what factors are most important for creating the patterns of urban plant diversity that we observe. This project explores how history of land-use in vacant lots affects the plants that grow there today and tests a restoration strategy for increasing urban plant diversity. I previously have conducted surveys of existing plant diversity in vacant lots in Baltimore, MD, USA. I found that in these vacant lots, there was more variation in plant diversity within areas that were remnant backyards than within the areas of the lots where buildings previously stood. I plan to expand these results to study whether the effects of different legacies of land-use on plant diversity change predictably over time, by collecting property records and reconstructing the history of when each house was abandoned and demolished. This will result in a description of what happens to abandoned urban land without human intervention. I will also collect data from a two-year long field experiment that experimentally increased the diversity of native wildflowers in “weedy” plant communities. I will use what is learned from this smaller experiment to guide a similar experimental restoration plan for entire vacant lots.
Research Advisor: Christopher M. Swan, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Department of Geography & Environmental Systems University of Maryland Baltimore County.

Learn more about Anna and her research here.

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAKELLY KSIAZEK, Northwestern University and the Chicago Botanic Garden (IL). The influence of seed and pollen movement on the diversity of green roof plant populations(IL). The conversion of natural land to cities means that more plants and animals need to live alongside people. Special rooftop gardens, called green roofs, could include plant species that have lost their normal living spaces on the ground. If plants are able to live successfully on green roofs, they could provide resources like food and nesting materials to many insects and birds. However, green roofs, like other urban gardens, tend to be located far away from each other. Spaces between the roofs might not be good places for plants and animals to live, causing green roofs to act like isolated islands throughout a city. If plants on green roofs are not connected to other plant populations, inbreeding can occur between a few closely related individuals. Over time, this could mean that all individuals on a green roof were related and would share the same inability to respond to stressful situations like droughts.
However, if green roofs received seeds and pollen from other locations, the plants could have a greater ability to adapt to changes in the environment. To date, little is known about how green roof plant populations are connected with plants in other habitats throughout cities. My research will determine the characteristics of plants that allow them to get to new green roofs and will compare the movement of pollen on green roofs to a typical natural habitat. Results of this research will allow future green roofs to be designed to support diverse and resilient groups of plants.
Research Advisor: Krissa Skogen, PhD Conservation Scientist at the Chicago Botanic Garden and Adjunct Professor at Northwestern University.

Learn more about Kelly and her research here.

Murphy_headshotSTEPHEN J MURPHY, The Ohio State University (OH). Forest landscape change in southwestern Pennsylvania (PA). A common misconception is that forests are static entities, remaining relatively unchanged through time unless subjected to a severe disturbance such as fire or logging. In reality, forests are constantly changing as certain species increase in abundance, others decrease, and yet others remain stable over time. Understanding this dynamic nature of forests is extremely important for predicting how they will look in the future, because changes in species composition can influence the types and values of services that these ecosystems provide. For example, the availability of suitable habitat for wildlife could be impacted, the types of nutrient input from litter could shift, or the types of timber that will be available for commercial purposes could change.
An existing series of forest plots established at Powdermill Nature Reserve offers a unique opportunity to study such changes in the forested landscape of southwestern Pennsylvania. I propose to resample a subset of these existing plots to determine how the number of species, the abundances of those species, and their overall sizes, has changed over a period of six years. Because significant changes in other forests throughout the eastern United States have been documented previously, I expect that the forests of southwestern Pennsylvania will also experience similar dynamism. Specifically, I expect to observe a decrease in drought-tolerant individuals, and an increase in moisture loving species. And because areas of the reserve are still recovering from past human land-use impacts, I expect to see an increase in the overall biomass of the forest.
Research Advisor: Liza S Comita, Assistant Professor, Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology, The Ohio State University.

cromulo_headshot2CHELSIE ROMULO, George Mason University (VA). Working to conserve and sustainably manage the ecologically, culturally, and economically important palm tree Mauritia flexuosa (aguaje) in the Peruvian Amazon (Peru). The aguaje palm tree (Mauritia flexuosa) covers approximately 10% of the Peruvian Amazon. Its fruit supports many different animal species in the Amazon rainforest, including tapirs, primates, peccaries, birds, turtles and fish. The fruit of this tree is harvested from the wild and sold in the city of Iquitos, which is the largest city and commercial center of the Peruvian Amazon. The most common harvest method is cutting down the tree, even though alternative climbing methods are available. Despite the long-term benefits of using sustainable harvesting techniques, future paybacks can seem irrelevant to people who have difficulty meeting their daily survival needs. My dissertation research proposes to combine an evaluation of tree distribution with interviews of people along the market chain to better understand the current conservation challenges surrounding aguaje. I want to understand the motivation of people who harvest and sell the fruit of this palm and review how the distribution of the tree has changed over the past 25 years. The changes in tree distribution over time will be evaluated using satellite images from the NASA Landsat program, which go back to 1972. With a better understanding of the consequences of current harvest and the perspectives of the people involved in the market I will produce recommendations for the conservation and sustainable management of this threatened palm and the forest.
Research Advisor: Dr. Michael Gilmore, Assistant Professor of Life Sciences/Integrative Studies. New Century College, George Mason University.

 Turner_headshotJESSICA B. TURNER, West Virginia University (WV),  The Root of Sustainability: Understanding and implementing medicinal plant conservation strategies in the face of land-use change in Appalachia (WV). American ginseng is a valuable medicinal plant that is culturally important worldwide. Ginseng is harvested by people in Appalachia and sold on the international market. Through human activity, ginseng’s habitat is being reduced; much of this land-use change is due to surface mining. How land was used historically can influence how well a plant grows and reproduces. My research studies the relationship between ginseng and surface mining, both from the ecosystem and social science perspective: (1) Can ginseng, and another medicinal plant, goldenseal, grow just as well on land that was previously surface-mined, as compared to forests with other types of land-use history? Through this reintroduction study, I will understand, depending on how well these plants grow, if previously mined-lands are lost as potential medicinal plant habitat, or if people could grow medicinal plants on previously mined lands. (2) How do people in Appalachia view surface mining and ginseng conservation? Through surveys, I will learn if people in both the Appalachian and ginseng harvester communities prioritize the forest and practice conservation. I will also be able to assess if attitudes toward surface mining effects might be different if restoration of medicinal plants was possible. By researching how people think about ginseng and surface mining, I can develop environmental education based on the community’s perspective of ginseng conservation. Understanding the impacts of surface mining on the role of ginseng in the forests, as well as the culture in Appalachia, will provide a basis for how people can conserve medicinal plants. Research Advisor: James B. McGraw, PhD, Eberly Professor of Biology, West Virginia University.

Learn more about Jessica and her research here.

Please join us in welcoming these wonderful Fellows and their exciting research to the Botany in Action program!

The above photos are courtesy of the 2014 BIA Fellows.

April 1, 2014

Amanda and Kate Visit Fairchild Tropical Botanic Gardens in Coral Gables, Florida!

by Melissa Harding

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Last week, educators Amanda Joy and Kate Borger attended a Fairchild Challenge summit at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Gardens in Coral Gables, Florida. Home of the Fairchild Challenge, the FTBG invited Challenge facilitators from all over the country to meet and discuss ways to improve their institutions’ program. Participants learned how to effectively evaluate their program, how to successfully write grants and work with local partners, and how to incorporate new aspects of the Challenge into their existing programs. Now open to elementary-age children, there is a whole new audience of students who are able to participate. Additionally, the Challenge has gone global in its reach and offers programs overseas, having trained over 60 gardens all over the world to offer the Fairchild Challenge.

Amanda and Kate had a wonderful time learning and meeting new educators, exploring the beautiful gardens, and just plain seeing the sun. They are excited to use their new knowledge to take the Fairchild Challenge at Phipps to the next level!

This photo was taken by Amanda Joy.

March 26, 2014

School Program Spotlight: Habitats

by Melissa Harding

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This school year, our department has added some new programs to the mix and we are so excited to be sharing them with our students and with you! In School Program Spotlight, we explore the content of some of our newest school programs.

A crime has been committed at Phipps! Someone stole a bunch of bananas from the forest and we need a detective to figure out who did it!

One of the most effective ways to capture a student’s attention is to tell them a story. Even better, tell them a story in which they can play a role. People love solving mysteries; it’s why we read Agatha Christie novels and watch crime procedurals on television. Students are no exception to this and using a well-crafted mystery can not only interest them in a science class, but in science in general. Why are mysteries so engaging? They turn students from passive listeners into active learners. Students must work with evidence, form a hypothesis, test that hypothesis and evaluate the results. Another name for this kind of learning in inquiry, but we prefer to think of it as detective work. In our new Habitats class, students are asked to solve a mystery in the jungle, learning about habitats along the way. This class consists of a classroom portion and a tour.

In the classroom portion of this field trip, students must solve the crime of the missing bananas. They are given some background on each suspect, a series of rain forest animals that live in different layers of the forest. Students eliminate suspects from their list by interviewing a variety of plants, each of whom has information on one suspect. Each plant reveals a clue as to who is responsible, or not, for stealing the bananas. Many plants provide an alibi for a particular suspect based on their own interactions with that animal. A plant may reveal that a particular animal doesn’t even eat fruit, but rather acts as a pollinator for it’s flowers. Another may reveal that a suspect was busy taking a nap in its branches during the crime. Each plant hints at the idea of interrelationships in nature and gives practical examples of the different parts of a habitat. After the criminal is finally found, the students explain to us that the plants and animals actually need each other to be a functioning habitat.

The tour portion of the program consists of a self-guided or docent-lead tour of the Conservatory. Those who would prefer a self-guided experience may request a PDF of our self-guided tour or explore on their own. Those who choose the docent-lead tour will learn about the history of the Conservatory and the plants of our tropical and desert biomes.

If you are a teacher and would like more information on how to sign up for this or any other school program, please use the “Registering for Programs” link in the menu above. Please note that scout groups, home school groups and other groups of 10 or more may sign up for any of our school programs as well!

The above photo was taken by Christie Lawry.

March 17, 2014

April Homegrown Challenge: Try Something New!

by Melissa Harding

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Please join us in a gardening season of botanical fun at Phipps with the Homegrown Challenge on our sister blog, The Porchside Gardener. What a great way to connect with nature as the weather grows warmer!

This first month, we challenge you to try something new!  As both eaters and gardeners, we can get stuck in routines of eating or growing the same things.  While it’s great to have our favorites, there are so many varieties of plants, fruits and vegetables to try and enjoy!  In trying new foods we may discover new flavors, have fun exploring, or add a new healthy food to our cooking routines.  Come summer you can find unique varieties of vegetables at your local farmer’s market, but for even more options, plant your own!

Follow the April challenges below to try something new.  When you do, snap a photo* and let us know.  Submitted challenges count towards admission to a free celebration at Phipps Conservatory, and entry into this month’s drawing!  This month you could win four free passes to Phipps, or a Cooking with Kids cookbook.

TASTE: Buy and prepare a fruit or vegetable you (or your children) haven’t tasted before.

Look at the market for in season produce.  Have you ever tried arugula, asparagus, fava beans, or fennel?

GARDEN: Plant a variety of vegetable you haven’t grown before.

Look into heirloom varieties, or visit a local seed library.  Check out our Garden Resources for more sources of seeds and seedlings

VISIT: Go to a garden center or plant nursery.

These are great places to find inspiration for your garden, pick up a few new plants, and find any tools or supplies you need for the growing season.  Click here for a list of Phipps recommended nurseries.

MAKE: Start (or expand) a garden! 

If you have lots of space or just a windowsill, you can grow food: build a raised bed, set up containers, grow herbs, or plant a fruit tree.  Find tips on starting a garden of any size here.

Have another idea?  If you have an idea for a different activity, or you want to take it a step further, go ahead!  Just send us a description and photo, and if it relates to the theme we’ll count it.

All submissions should be sent to homegrown@phipps.conservatory.org, and include a photo*, your name, and the challenge(s) you completed.

*By submitting an image, each user agrees Phipps shall have a non-exclusive, perpetual, irrevocable, royalty-free license to the image submitted (including all rights embodied therein) and that Phipps, and their respective designees may edit, modify, post, creative derivatives work of and distribute the image and all elements of such image, including, without limitation, the names and likenesses of any persons or locations embodied therein, in any and all media now known or hereafter devised, including for advertising and marketing, without compensation or notification to, or permission from, entrant or any third party. Credit to photographers will be printed in any and all use cases. Phipps does not guarantee the posting of any image and reserves the right to take down any image at any time.

The above photo was taken by Gabe Tilove.

March 13, 2014

Interview with a Scientist: BIA Fellow, Anna Johnson

by Melissa Harding

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If there is one segment of society that is often misunderstood, it is people who work in science fields. Public perception of scientists tends to lean towards lab coats, crazy hair and beakers full of chemicals, especially in the eyes of children.  In reality, most scientists are just regular people who want to make the world a better place through scientific discovery. The best way to dispel the myth that scientists are boring or crazy is to get to know them; the purpose of this segment is to talk with real scientists to ask them what they love about their jobs and why they think their work is fun and important.

For our forth installment in this series, we sat down with BIA Fellow Anna Johnson. The Botany in Action Fellowship program at Phipps fosters the development of the next generation of plant-based scientists who are committed, first, to excellent research, and second, to educational outreach. The BIA program provides Fellows with funding for use towards field research in the US or abroad and a trip to Phipps, to engage in science outreach training and opportunities to share his or her research to public audiences. Anna is in her first year as a BIA Fellow, studying urban biodiversity.

We interviewed Anna about her love of teaching science, her time working with inmates, and why learning science helps kids to feel empowered.

1. Describe your work:
I study the ecological processes that drive patterns of urban biodiversity. I am particularly interested in connecting ecological research results to urban sustainability initiatives, and engaging underserved populations in the practice and outcomes of research. My research advisor and I are currently working on a long-term project with other academic, non-profit and governmental collaborators to set up and maintain experimental restorations of native plant communities in vacant lots found in low-income neighborhoods in Baltimore City.
2. Why did you become a scientist?
I went to college for a general liberal arts degree (a bachelor of arts), but fell in love with the natural history component of my freshman introductory biology lab. This inspired me to intern during a following summer as an environmental educator at a nature center on the Chesapeake Bay. But, I quickly became frustrated by all the things I didn’t know about the ecosystems I was showing to the children I worked with. In the process of educating myself to teach lessons, I realized that being a scientist involved thinking creatively and asking the sorts of questions I was most interested in already, and that it wasn’t “too hard” or “boring” at all. So I worked in an evolutionary ecology research lab for a few years after college, and then applied to get my PhD in ecology.
3. What is your favorite part about being a scientist?
I love getting to spend time with other scientists who are passionate about systems that I don’t study and don’t know much about. I am a plant ecologist but I go to school in a geography department with a wide range of researchers–I never thought I would find meteorology, hydrology or geology interesting (I like things that are alive!), but watching friends get really excited about stream flow models or hurricane trajectories helps me keep an open mind and notice connections I wouldn’t think about on my own.
4. What is the most important quality in a scientist?
Being able to think creatively and independently
5. What is the coolest thing you have ever done at work?
Well, the coolest thing lately is that I got to spend a day last week at the Maryland Transition Center in Baltimore City, building a greenhouse and planting seeds with a group of inmates—something I never imagined I would be doing when I went back to school. Also, I’m responding to these survey questions from Germany, where I’m attending an international ecology conference—science is a great excuse to travel.
6. If you weren’t a scientist, what other job would you want to do?
For a while I thought I wanted to be a botanical illustrator but I realized that I don’t have the patience or consistent attention to fine detail       that this requires. I would probably either want to teach middle school or work in local government; anything that is hands-on and involves some story-telling and arguing.
7. What are your hobbies outside of  your research?
I read a lot of novels, garden/do battle with roving herds of urban deer and spend time with family and friends. I also love exploring my two       favorite cities, Baltimore and Pittsburgh.
8. Why is science important?
Science is a system for understanding the world around us, not just a collection of facts. Thinking scientifically helps us to ask meaningful questions and productively explore the causes and consequences of our actions as a society.
9. Why is it important for kids to learn science?
Science is empowering! We live in a complex world and science is about problem-solving. It helps kids to put together the pieces and start to make “educated guesses” about what will happen next and why things are the way they are. Science makes really little things not so insignificant and really big things not so overwhelming because it places them all in the context of human concerns.

Anna is an example of someone who loved learning about science so much that she quit her job as a teacher to pursue it full-time. She not only gets to spend her days researching her passions, but she also has an appreciation for the research of others. Life-long learning is something that we all strive for, whether or not we are scientists. To learn more about how science communication creates life-long learners, check out this post.

To learn more about Anna’s work, check out her Follow the Fellows page on the Botany in Action Website.

The above photo was taken by Amanda Joy.

March 12, 2014

Gardening Fun with Phipps: Join the Homegrown Challenge!

by Melissa Harding

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Please join us in a gardening season of botanical fun at Phipps with the Homegrown Challenge on our sister blog, The Porchside Gardener. What a great way to connect with nature as the weather grows warmer!

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens is excited to introduce Homegrown Challenges, to help you and your family grow food, eat locally and live sustainably, no matter how much (or how little) outdoor space you have. 

What are Homegrown Challenges?

From April through September, follow along and learn about a new garden theme each month by doing fun activities for the whole family.  Each month you’ll see four types of activities you can do, falling under categories: taste, garden, visit, or make.  Pick your favorite, try a different one each month, or do them all!  Then let us know for a chance at great prizes.

How do I participate?

When you complete a challenge activity, make sure you take a photo of you in action to send to us.*  Each month there will be a drawing for two prizes- you could win four free passes to Phipps Conservatory, or a prize related to the theme.  Complete six challenges and come to a special event at Phipps Conservatory for free!  That’s an average of one per month, but you can jump in at any time (event to be held in October 2014, details TBD).

Completed challenges should be sent to homegrown@phipps.conservatory.org, and include your name, a photo of the activity, which activity you completed, and anything else you’d like to tell us about your experience with the challenges.

Who can participate?

Anyone!  Homegrown Challenges can be completed by everyone, but they are particularly geared towards those who interact with children: parents, caregivers, daycare centers, etc.

Check back each month for the new challenges, and links to helpful resources and posts.  We’ll link you to each new challenge as it comes out!

April Challenge: Try Something New

May Challenge: Encourage Pollinators

June Challenge: Reduce Waste

July Challenge: Embrace the Power of Sun and Rain

August Challenge: Share the Bounty

September Challenge: Think Ahead

Check out our rack card. Click on the image to enlarge it and learn more!

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*By submitting an image, each user agrees Phipps shall have a non-exclusive, perpetual, irrevocable, royalty-free license to the image submitted (including all rights embodied therein) and that Phipps, and their respective designees may edit, modify, post, creative derivatives work of and distribute the image and all elements of such image, including, without limitation, the names and likenesses of any persons or locations embodied therein, in any and all media now known or hereafter devised, including for advertising and marketing, without compensation or notification to, or permission from, entrant or any third party. Credit to photographers will be printed in any and all use cases. Phipps does not guarantee the posting of any image and reserves the right to take down any image at any time

The above photo was taken by Adam Milliron.

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